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General AutoCrit Help › 1. FAQ


How do I get a copy of my work with highlights?

The AutoCrit Editor allows you to print and email your text including highlights by selecting the Email and Print options within the Analysis Sidebar.  If you wish not to see the highlights, click here for more information.     Print: Selecting the print button will bring up a traditional print dialogue box.  Simply select your

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What type of files can I upload?

AutoCrit supports all text files (those files ending with .txt), MS Word files (.docx), and rich text files (.rtf). Please contact customer support if a file type you wish to use is not supported.

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How do I analyze my text?

Click on the Category button located at the top of your screen to analyze your text. During editing, you can update your analysis results at any time by clicking on the Category button again.

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How do I upload a new file?

The following video provides a step by step guide on how to bring text into the AutoCrit editor using either the Paste or Upload methods.   Step 1: Select the Upload button located under the file drop down menu at the top of your text. Step 2: Select the Browse button. Navigate to the location

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How do I save and load a revision?

AutoCrit only allows for a maximum of 50 saved revisions. Upon reaching the maximum 50 files, each successive save will result in the loss of your oldest file.  Use the export command to save a copy of your revisions and prevent loss of data. To load a previously saved revision of your work:  select the Open button

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Why doesn't AutoCrit check for spelling and grammar?

No Grammar Checker? We have looked long and hard for grammar checking software that we feel comfortable bringing into AutoCrit. From the outset, we severely underestimated the challenge this would pose as time and time again the various software systems failed our tests. At best, they would find 20% of the errors in the test

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How do I bring back my smart (curved) quotes?

Many word processing programs (including Microsoft Word) automatically convert straight quotes typed by the user into curved quotes.  The name "smart quotes" originates from the logic used by the program to determine which typed quotes are opening and closing.  Microsoft Word hides the logic behind the scenes with embedded code in your text. AutoCrit must

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