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Interpreting the AutoCrit Results


Summary Report: Overall Score and Fingerprint

AutoCrit’s Summary Report brings all of your book’s analysis together in one place – making it easier for you to see your progress and pinpoint where to go next. At the top of your Summary Report, you’ll see two core features: Overall Score and your AutoCrit Fingerprint. Here’s how to get the most out of […]

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Uncommon Words In Fiction

The categorization of words as either common or complex is an essential element in many readability calculations. A higher percentage of known or common words will result in text that is more readily comprehensible by a wider audience. This report characterizes whether a word is complex or common based on the frequency of appearance in […]

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Dialogue Tags Report

The AutoCrit analysis helps you identify the kinds of dialogue tags you’re using in your manuscript and how often you’re using them. This helps you in two ways: Editors and readers prefer minimal use of dialogue tags in fiction. This tool helps you determine whether you need to cut any excessive or unnecessary tags. It […]

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Adverbs in Dialogue

A major pitfall of amateur writers is the use of adverbs in dialogue tags.  Adverbs are those –ly words that modify verbs. For example: quickly asked. said angrily. wistfully said. happily replied. In fiction, adverbs tend to weaken your writing. So the general rule in fiction is to eliminate as many adverbs as possible, and replace them […]

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Adverbs

If there’s one telltale sign of an amateur writer, it’s a manuscript crammed with adverbs. Adverbs are those –ly words, like quickly or angrily, that we tend to rely on in early drafts.  But now that you’re in the editing process, most of them need to go. Why remove adverbs? Adverbs rely on weak verbs […]

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Passive Indicators

Passive voice. Just hearing that term conjures images of ninth-grade English class with all its confusing grammar rules. Never fear: AutoCrit is here to help you figure out what passive voice really means, why it’s (usually) bad, and how to avoid it in your manuscript. In the English language, there are two ways to construct […]

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Showing vs. Telling Indicators

 Show, don’t tell. It’s the first rule of writing, and for good reason. In a nutshell, showing is about using description and action to help the reader experience the story. Telling is when the author summarizes or uses exposition to simply tell the reader what is happening. For example: Telling: John was sad to […]

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Clichés

He wanted all hands on deck… She had an axe to grind… It was tough to make ends meet… His hands were tied… The game was a nail biter… If these phrases sound familiar, it’s because they are. They’re clichés–phrases that have become so overused they’re considered stale and unoriginal. There are thousands of clichés […]

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Initial Pronoun and Names

  This analysis helps you see how often you start sentences in your manuscript with either a pronoun (she, he, it) or a name. Imagine if every sentence in a novel started the same way: Joe heard footsteps coming up the stairs. Joe froze. Joe looked around, trying to find a place to hide. Joe […]

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Sentence Starters

  As writers, we want to mix up our sentence structures—it makes our writing livelier and more interesting than if every sentence starts the same way. But we have to watch out for two common pitfalls with sentence construction: starting sentences with an initial conjunction or an initial –ING verb. Initial conjunctions are when you start your sentences […]

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